Who is heard and who is not defines the status quo

“A valued person lives in a society in which her story has a place. Violence against women is often against our voices… and of what a voice means: the right to self-determination, to participation, to consent or dissent; to live and participate, to interpret and narrate.

Who is heard and who is not defines the status quo.

Women’s opinions are constantly policed because opinions are part of the public sphere and, under a patriarchal system, women are to remain in the private sphere.”

“I think that what our society teaches young girls… is that you’re supposed to hold back sometimes, pull back, don’t quite say, don’t be too pushy, because you have to be likable.

“A free person tells her own story.”

 

This article is a really great breakdown of the Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie situation.

There’s a great satisfaction in the irony that those who are silencing or “correcting” her and her supporters are proving her very point — that males are in control, that males are heard and prioritized, that females with opinions will be always be reprimanded when they step outside the allowable male-determined party line.

The transgender activist movement is led by transwomen — males — not by transmen. Ever notice which group publishes more articles, gets retweeted more, gets interviewed more? This is no coincidence. Transwomen combine two things that patriarchy loves: maleness, and all the authority that comes with that, and “sexiness”: lipstick, heels, and flashed cleavage. Overcoming its tendency for homophobia — which was mostly discarded long ago, really — is a small price to pay to keep the primacy of male authority and sexiness in the public consciousness. Patriarchal business as usual.

Women: Are you still waiting for males to give you permission to have an opinion of your own? Don’t hold your breath.

 

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